The Value of Design in the Built Environment (Scotland): Update: August 2014

DOUG WHEELER PROVIDES AN UPDATE ON THE VALUE OF DESIGN WORK

The research report into the Value of Design that was commissioned in November 2013 by the Building Standards Division on behalf of the Planning and Architecture Division within the Directorate for Local Government and Communities was published at the end of July.

 

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Built-Environment/AandP/Skills/Value-of-Design

 

I directed the research team with Ryden (Mark Robertson) and Austin-Smith:Lord (Graham Ross).  The purpose of the research was to provide an analysis of how ‘value’ is handled in the development process in Scotland.  The research report runs to fifty two pages with an Executive Summary and Appendices that includes four case studies.

 

At the outset it was recognised in the research and consultations that this is a vast, important, very relevant and topical subject.  There was a significant level of interest and engagement in the research by very experienced consultees from across the design, construction and property sectors/professions. In all around 150 contributions were received from individuals involved in the development process in Scotland, the Team appreciated the efforts and would like to thank the contributors. 

 

The Team’s Methodology is summarised in the PDF available here (4.62MB). The research team’s recommendations are in the form of an Action Plan for the Planning and Architecture Division.

 

On publication a Scottish Government spokesperson said, ‘The publication of the research paper on the ‘Value of Design’ marks the first attempt, by the Scottish Government, to look into the value that good design can add to a place.  The topic area is subjective and complex, with multiple factors that can influence value.  Overall, the findings should help to continually support the central purpose of creating good quality sustainable places. This in turn should provide more confidence to the development industry, as well as communities, that investment in good design is important’.

 

If you have any views on the research report or require more background information please contact: Susie Stirling (Susan.Stirling@scotland.gsi.gov.uk) or Doug Wheeler (mail@douglaswheelerssociates.com.)

The research report into the Value of Design that was commissioned in November 2013 by the Building Standards Division on behalf of the Planning and Architecture Division within the Directorate for Local Government and Communities was published at the end of July.

 

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Built-Environment/AandP/Skills/Value-of-Design

 

I directed the research team with Ryden (Mark Robertson) and Austin-Smith:Lord (Graham Ross).  The purpose of the research was to provide an analysis of how ‘value’ is handled in the development process in Scotland.  The research report runs to fifty two pages with an Executive Summary and Appendices that includes four case studies.

 

At the outset it was recognised in the research and consultations that this is a vast, important, very relevant and topical subject.  There was a significant level of interest and engagement in the research by very experienced consultees from across the design, construction and property sectors/professions. In all around 150 contributions were received from individuals involved in the development process in Scotland, the Team appreciated the efforts and would like to thank the contributors. 

 

The Team’s Methodology is summarised in the PDF available here (4.62MB). The research team’s recommendations are in the form of an Action Plan for the Planning and Architecture Division.

 

On publication a Scottish Government spokesperson said, ‘The publication of the research paper on the ‘Value of Design’ marks the first attempt, by the Scottish Government, to look into the value that good design can add to a place.  The topic area is subjective and complex, with multiple factors that can influence value.  Overall, the findings should help to continually support the central purpose of creating good quality sustainable places. This in turn should provide more confidence to the development industry, as well as communities, that investment in good design is important’.

 

If you have any views on the research report or require more background information please contact: Susie Stirling (Susan.Stirling@scotland.gsi.gov.uk) or Doug Wheeler (mail@douglaswheelerssociates.com.)